Writers from South Korea

South Korea
1970
Tong-gyu HWANG
South Korea
1971
Chan-kyung SUNG
South Korea
1973
In-hoon CHOE
South Korea
1978
Yoon-shik KIM
South Korea
1979
Tae-ch'ol SHIN
South Korea
1980
Hyon-jong CHONG
South Korea
1980
Hijin PARK
South Korea
1983
Se-wook HUH
South Korea
1984
Je-chun PARK
South Korea
1985
Jang-soon SOHN
South Korea
1986
Chang-whan CHO
South Korea
1987
Sae-young OH
South Korea
1988
Tong-choon SHIN
South Korea
1989
Dae-soon Bom
South Korea
1990
Jiwon KIM
South Korea
1991
Hye Ryon HAHM
South Korea
1992
Tong-ho CHOI
South Korea
1993
Jong-joo (hailji) RIM
South Korea
1993
Seung-hee KIM
South Korea
1994
Seung Ja CHOI
South Korea
1995
Chung Hee MOON
South Korea
1996

KIM In Ae writes under the pen name of Kim Suh-Jung. She teaches at several colleges in Seoul and is a researcher at the Korea-Froebel Institute of Child Education. She holds the Ph.D. from the Department of Creative Literature at Chung Ang University. Dr. Kim is the author of A Conference of Ghosts (1991) and Nabi, Sabi, Bappi, the Three Kittens, (1994). She is also an active literary translator, with over 25 works from English and German into Korean. Dr. Kim is attending the IWP through the joint sponsorship of the Korean Culture and Arts Foundation and the University of Iowa.

South Korea
1997

HAN Ki (born in Seoul, 1959) is an assistant professor at Ansung National Univversity and recently joined Literature and Thought magazine. His publications include Literature and Society at a Turning Point (1991) and At the Threshold of Rationalism (1997). He holds the Ph.D. in Korean modern literature from Seoul National University. The Korean Culture and Arts Foundation is providing his grant in cooperation with the IWP.

South Korea
1998

HAN Kang (born 1970, Kwang-ju) began her writing career in 1993, with the publication of a number of poems. The same year, she graduated from Yon-sei University, where she studied Korean Language and Literature. In 1994, her poems won a prize in the annual literary contest held by Seoul-Shinmun, the national newspaper. Since then, however, Ms. Han has been concentrating more on fiction than on poetry. After publication of a number of her texts, her first book of short stories, The Love of Yeosu, was published in 1995. Her first novel, The Black Deer, was published this summer. Her participation in the IWP is funded by the Korean Culture and Arts Foundation.

South Korea
2000, 2003 Alumna/Alumnus

HWANG Jaewoo writes under the pen name Hwang JiWoo. He is professor and chair of the Department of Playwriting at the Korean National University of Arts. He led a new wave of deconstructionist poetry in the 1980s, which was part of the new "rhetoric of resistance" in Korean literature. His subsequent work is described as embodying a native spirit, with its Korean Zen Buddhist traditions interwoven with paradox, vitality and wit. He is the author of six poetry collections, among them Even the Birds Leave the Land (1983), A Lotus in the Crab's Eye (199), I'll Sit Alone in a Darkened Pub (1998); four plays, including A Diary on the Fat Sofa (staged in 1994), Thirty Days in Prison, staged in 1999), and Bride May (2000). Hwang Jaewoo studied aesthetics and art history at Seoul National University. His education was interrupted by a forced enlistment in the army following his imprisonment for student activism against the military dictatorship. His work has received numerous national awards, including the Contemporary Literature Prize of 1991 and the DaeSan Foundation Prize in 1999. Recently, he published a play, A Materialistic Man (2003), and a translation of his poetry, Even Birds Leave the World (trans. Christopher Merrill and Won-Chung Kim), is forthcoming from White Pine Press.

South Korea
2001

Man-sik LEE (poet, Korea; b. 1953) is deputy professor at Kyungwon College and is currently writing a doctoral dissertation on T.S. Eliot at Korea University's Department of English Literature. Mr. Lee has written extensively on deconstruction as literary theory, and his translation of Jonathan Culler's On Deconstruction was selected as one of Korea's Best Scholarly Books of 1998. He has published two poetry collections: God's Baseball Game Ticket (1997) and On Poetry (1994). The Korean Culture and Arts Foundation and the University of Iowa are supporting his participation.

South Korea
2000, 2003 Alumna/Alumnus

HWANG Jaewoo writes under the pen name Hwang JiWoo. He is professor and chair of the Department of Playwriting at the Korean National University of Arts. He led a new wave of deconstructionist poetry in the 1980s, which was part of the new "rhetoric of resistance" in Korean literature. His subsequent work is described as embodying a native spirit, with its Korean Zen Buddhist traditions interwoven with paradox, vitality and wit. He is the author of six poetry collections, among them Even the Birds Leave the Land (1983), A Lotus in the Crab's Eye (199), I'll Sit Alone in a Darkened Pub (1998); four plays, including A Diary on the Fat Sofa (staged in 1994), Thirty Days in Prison, staged in 1999), and Bride May (2000). Hwang Jaewoo studied aesthetics and art history at Seoul National University. His education was interrupted by a forced enlistment in the army following his imprisonment for student activism against the military dictatorship. His work has received numerous national awards, including the Contemporary Literature Prize of 1991 and the DaeSan Foundation Prize in 1999. Recently, he published a play, A Materialistic Man (2003), and a translation of his poetry, Even Birds Leave the World (trans. Christopher Merrill and Won-Chung Kim), is forthcoming from White Pine Press.

JEONG Han-Yong
South Korea
2003 Resident

JEONG Han Yong (b. 1958, Choongju) is editor of the two most influential literary magazines in Korea: Spirit & Expression and People Loving Poetry. The first magazine deals with multiple genres of literature while the latter is dedicated solely to poetry. He also manages PoemCafe (www.poemcafe.com), a global network of poets which began in 2000 and now has more than 90 members worldwide. Mr. Jeong majored in modern Korean poetry, and received his Ph.D. at Kyeonghee University in Seoul. He has published three books of poems: The Appointment with a Stranger (1990), Sad Santa Fe (1994), and Nana Stories (1999). He also has a collection of essays titled Two Reports about Hell (1995). His next collection of poems will be out in late 2003. He is participating courtesy of the Korean Culture and Art Foundation.

KIM Young-Ha
South Korea
2003 Resident

KIM Young-Ha (b. 1968, Seoul) published his debut novel Nanen nareul pagiohal gweolliga itda [I Have a Right to Destroy Myself] in 1996. The novel was translated into the French as La Mort a Demi-mots (Editions Philippe Picquier, 1998). A prolific writer, he has written more than seven books as well as a significant number of essays and film reviews. In 1999, he won the 44th Contemporary Literature Prize for the novel Dangsine Namu [Your Tree, 1999]. He is also the host of a daily radio show on books and authors. He is participating courtesy of The Korea Literary Translation Institute.

Ethan W. KIM
South Korea
2003 Resident

Ethan W. KIM (b. 1959, Changhung) is an associate professor of English Literature at Sungkyunkwan University in Seoul, Korea. He has received his Ph. D. in English from University of Iowa (1993) and written widely about contemporary American poets, especially ecopoets such as Gary Snyder, Wendell Berry, and A.R. Ammons. He is vice-president of ASLE_Korea (Association for the Study of Literature and Environment) and editor of Literature and Environment. He was awarded several times Korean Literature Translation Institute Grant and Daesan Foundation Award, and has translated more than six books of Korean poetry, including Heart's Agony (White Pine Press, 1998), Flowers in the Toilet Bowl (Homa & Sekey, Fall, 2003), and Trees of the World (Kegan Paul International, forthcoming). Presently he is translating with Christopher Merrill the works of Jiwoo Hwang (2000 IWP participant) and an anthology of contemporary Korean poetry. He is participating courtesy of the Freeman Foundation.

JO Kyung-ran
South Korea
2004 Resident

JO Kyung-ran earned her undergraduate degree in Creative Writing from Seoul Institute of the Arts, debuting with The French Optician (1996) which won the Donga-Ilbo Prize. That same year, her novel Time for Baking Bread won the 1st Literary Community New Writer's Award. Her works also include Movement (1998), Origin of the Family (1999), My Purple Sofa (2000), We've Met Before (2001), Searching for the Elephant (2002), the essay " Jo Kyung Ran's Crocodile Story" (with illustrations by Junko Yamakusa, 2003), the 2003 novella A Narrow Gate, which won the 48th Contemporary Literary Prize, and a new book to appear this November. Her work has earned numerous literary awards, including Today's Young Artist Prize from the Ministry of Culture and Tourism, and has been translated into German and Japanese. She is participating courtesy of the Korea Literary Translation Institute.

KWON Ji-Ye
South Korea
2004 Resident

KWON Ji-Ye writes in a wide range of fictional genres. She earned a degree in English from Ewha University, taught middle school, and received a doctoral degree from the University of Paris in 2000. Since then, she has lectured at various Korean universities, including most recently, Donghae. Kwon made her Korean literary debut in 1997 with the story, "The Dreaming Marionette," in the magazine, LaPlume; her story also appears in an eponymously titled collection published in 2002. That same year, she won the Isang Literary Prize, Korea's highest award for literature for her short story, "Eel Stew," which was also translated into Chinese. Her second short story collection was Burst of Laughter (2003) and her latest work, a novel called A Beautiful Hell, was published in early 2004 by Literature and Ideas Publishing Company. The essay, "Kwon Ji-Ye's Paris, Paris, Paris," was published in July 2004. Kwon, who now lives and writes full-time in Seoul, is participating courtesy of the Korean Culture and Arts Foundation.

JUNG Young-Moon
South Korea
2005 Resident

JUNG Young-Moon has translated more than forty English titles into Korean, including Raymond Carver’s What We Talk About When We Talk About Love, Lee Chang-Rae’s Aloft, Nicholson Baker’s Fermata, and Germaine Greer’s The Boy. After publishing his novel A Man who Barely Exists (1997) and the collection Black Chain Stories (1998) he received the Dongseo Literary Award in 1999. In the last five years, he has published four more collections of stories, a novella, and two novels, and taught creative writing at Korea’s Seongsin University. He is participating courtesy of Korea Literary Translation Institute.

South Korea
2005 Resident

KIM Jee-woon is one of the most prominent directors of the so-called Post New Korean New Wave. He began his career as a stage actor and director, with Hot Sea (1994) and Movie Movie (1995). His move to screenwriting brought quick success: in 1997 his screenplays Wonderful Seasons and The Quiet Family both won first prizes at festivals. Kim's directorial debut was The Quiet Family, which won top honors at the Portugal Fantasporto Film Festival, and was an official selection at the Berlin International Film Festival. His next movie, The Foul King, which he wrote and directed, rose to become the number-one movie in Korea for six months—sealing his reputation as one of his country's leading directors.

YIM Phil-sung
South Korea
2005 Resident

YIM Phil-sung is well-known for his distinctive short films Souvenir (1997), Baby (1998) and So Nyeon Gi (1999, ‘Brushing’), all shown at the Clermont-Ferrand, Chicago and Venice international film festivals. After completing the short Mobil (2004, part of the omnibus feature Show Me), presented at Puchon Fantastic Film Festival, he embarked on his first full-length feature Antarctic Journal, based on his eponymous novel and starring Song Gang-Ho. This mystery thriller, revolving around a Korean expedition to the continent, was released this summer in Korea and Japan. He participates courtesy of the Freeman Foundation.

YOO Jae-Hyun
South Korea
2005 Resident

YOO Jae-Hyun studied electronic engineering at Ajou University, then devoted himself to Korea’s labor movement, serving as chief editor for two national unions' publications. He made his literary debut in 1992 with “Rolling Stones” in the Korean magazine Creation & Criticism, and several stories followed. After a ten-year hiatus, he returned to writing with a novel, Sihanoukville Stories, and two long essays, “The Sad Shadow of Mekong: Indochina” and “SweetTropics.” He contributes articles, columns and serializations to various magazines. He is participating courtesy of the Korean Culture and Arts Foundation.

Byoung-Yong KIM
South Korea
2006 Resident

Byoung-Yong KIM is the author of the novels Their Guns (1993) and Blooming Flowers (1997). He has taught literature and creative writing at several South Korean colleges and universities. In 2006 he published his latest short story collection, How Do Dogs Laugh? A prolific coordinator of literary activities and programs, he is at present the chief researcher of the Choi Myung-Hee Literary Museum, and an adjunct professor at the Jeonju National University of Education. He participates courtesy of The Arts Council Korea.

CHOI Jung Lae
South Korea
2006 Resident

CHOI Jung Lae has published four books of poetry, most notably Tigers in the Sunlight, which received the Kimdaljin Literary Prize in 1999, and Red Dry Field, which won the Isu Literary Prize in 2003. She holds a PhD in Korean modern poetry from Korea University, where she has recently lectured. She has also served as a research professor at Jeonju University, located in Jeollabuk-do. She participates courtesy of the Korean Literature Translation Institute.

RA Heeduk
South Korea
2007 Resident

RA Heeduk received her PhD in Korean Language and Literature from Yonsei University in 2006. She has authored five books of poetry, most recently ‘A Disappeared Palm’ (2004); one collection of essays (‘A Water Bucket Filled By Half,’ 1999); and a volume of literary criticism (‘Where Does the Purple Come From,’ 2003). Among her awards is an I-San Prize for Literature (2004). She currently teaches literature at Chosun University in Kwangju. She participates courtesy of Arts Council Korea.

KIM Reon
South Korea
2007 Resident

KIM Reon holds a degree in English literature from Yonsei University. She is the author of six novels, most recently ‘Gardenia and Mulberry in the Summer Days’ (2006). Among her awards is the 1997 Hankyoreh Literature Award, which she received for her fourth novel, ‘So Was I Once a Swinger of Birches.’ Her fiction has appeared in numerous journals and magazines. She participates courtesy of the Korean Literature Translation Institute.

LEE Jang Wook
South Korea
2008 Resident

LEE Jang Wook has authored two poetry collections, [‘A Sand Mountain In My Dream’] (2002), and [‘Hopeful Song at Noon’] (2006).  He has also written two books of essays on poetry and a novel, [‘Joyful Devils of Callot’] (2005).  He lives in Seoul, where he edits the South Korean quarterly, Changbi.  He participates courtesy of the Korea Literature Translation Institute (KLTI).

South Korea
2008 Resident

KIM Gyeongmee began her literary career by winning the first prize for poetry from JoongAng Daily Newspaper. She has published three books of poems: Can't I Continue Writing the Suspended Letter Again (1989), For the Selfish Sorrows (1995), and Shh, My concubine is (2001), as well as two books of photo essays, The Sea Comes to Me (2004), and The Lastborn (2006). She won the Nojak Literary Award in 2005 and the Best Radio Writer Award from the Korean TV & Radio Writers Association in 2007. Currently, she is working for KBS as a writer while pursuing a master's degree in Korean literature at Korea University.

KIM Soom
South Korea
2009 Resident

KIM Soom has published three novels, [‘Idiots’] (2006), [‘The Iron’] (2008), and [‘The Water’] (2009), and two collections of short stories, [‘The Fighting Dog’] (2005) and [‘The Bed’], which was selected by Hyundae Munhak as the 2007 Best Novel of the Year. Kim has been a finalist for several literary awards, and was the recipient of the 1998 Munhakdongne prize for new writers. Currently she is an editor at Yolimwon Publishing, and works as a book reviewer for a number of newspapers and literary journals. Her participation is independently funded.

KANG Youngsook
South Korea
2009 Resident

KANG Youngsook made her literary debut with the short story collection [‘Shaken’] in (2002). Her other story collections are [‘Every Day is a Celebration’](2004) and [‘Black in Red’](2009). For her full-length novel, Rina (2006),which was serialized in the quarterly Literary Joongang, she received the 39th Hankook Ilbo Award. She has participated in the Seoul Young Writers’ Festival and the East Asia Literature Forum in 2008. Since 1990, Kang has served as an advisory member of the Korea Dialogue Academy. She participates courtesy of Arts Council Korea.

KIM Do Eon
South Korea
2009 Resident

KIM Do Eon made his debut with the short story "Scenes Along the Stream with Iron Stairs," which won the Daejeon Ilbo literary contest in 1998. The following year he won the Hankook Ilbo literary contest with "Boy Meets Girl." He has since published a novella, three short story collections and, in 2008, the novel This Much Trivial Melancholy . Kim has received an ACK Emerging Writers award, and currently edits at Samtoh and Thinking Tree Publishing. He participates courtesy of the Korea Literature Translation Institute (KLTI).

CHO Yong Mee
South Korea
2010 Resident

CHO Yong Mee is the recipient of the 2005 Kim Dal Jin Literary Prize. She is the author of four poetry collections; Anxiety Encroaches upon a Soul (1996), Ten Thousand Fish Fly up a Mountain (2000), Self Portrait in Hempen Mourning Clothes (2004), and Cherry Trees Blossoming in My Cottage (2007). Cho Yong Mee has also published a collection of essays, titled One Hundred Years on an Island (2007). Since 2009, she’s written a regular column for KyungHyang newspaper. She participates courtesy of the Korea Literature Translation Institute (KLTI).

KIM Sa-in
South Korea
2010 Resident

KIM Sa-in has published two collections of poetry, Night Letters (1987) and Liking in Silence (2006), four collections of criticism, including A Deep Reading of the Novels of Park Sang-Ryung (2001), and a book of essays, A Warm Bowl of Rice (2006). Following time in prison in the early 1980s he began writing poetry and co- founded the magazine "Poetry and Economy." Among his awards are the Sin Dong-Yup Grant for Writing (1987), Modern Literature Prize for poetry (2005), and the Daesan Literature Prize for poetry (2006). He teaches creative writing at Dongduk Women's University, and hosts broadcast programs devoted to poetry and spirituality. His participation is made possible by Arts Council Korea.

LEE Hey-Kyung
South Korea
2011 Resident

LEE Hye-Kyung (fiction writer, novelist; South Korea) taught high school before making her literary debut in 1982. She is the author of the novel [A House on the Road] (1995), and the short story collections [In Front of That House] (1998) and [In The Shadow of Flowers] (2002), and [A Niche] (2006). Her work has received a number of awards, including the 1995 Today's Writer Award, the 1998 Hankook Ilbo Literature Prize, and the Dongin Literature Prize for the story collection [A Niche]. In 2004, [A House on the Road] was honored with Literaturpreis in Germany. She participates courtesy of the Korea Literature Translation Institute (KLTI).

PARK Chan Soon
South Korea
2011 Resident

PARK Chan Soon (fiction writer, translator; South Korea) made her literary debut in 2006 after working as a film translator for dubbing and subtitling for thirty years, with over fifty documentaries and hundreds of feature films to her credit. She has also worked as a subtitler for film festivals, and translated a number of books for adults and children. She is the author of [Whisperings of a Translator – Movie Translation, Aesthetics of Communication] (2005); her first collection of short stories, [The Garden of Balhae] came out in 2009. She is a professor of English Literature at Seoul Women's University. Her participation is made possible by Arts Council Korea.

Choi Myoung Sook
South Korea
2012 Resident

CHOI Myoung Sook (playwright; South Korea) is a lecturer of drama and modern culture at Soonchunhyang and Baeksuk Universities. She has written six staged plays, including 모텔 피아노 [Motel Piano] (2007), 두 아이 [Two Daughters](2011) and directed the [Actors Read Novels] series in Seoul from 2008 to 2012. The title play for her published collection, 그리고 또 하루 [And Again, Another Day] (2009), was staged at the 33rd Seoul Theatre Festival in 2012 and won the prize for drama. Her participation is funded by Arts Council Korea.

Hae Yisoo
South Korea
2012 Resident

HAE Yisoo (fiction writer; South Korea) made his debut in 2000. After two story collections, 캥거루가 있는 사막 [The Kangaroo in the Desert] (2006) and 젤리피쉬  [The Jellyfish] (2009), his first novel, 고쿄 [Gokyo Peak], will be published serially online this year. He is the recipient of the 2004 Sim Hoon Literary Award and the 2010 Han Moosuk Literary Award.  He has worked at the International Creative Writing Center at Dankook University, and coordinated the 2010 Seoul International Writers’ Festival. He participates courtesy of the Korea Literature Translation Institute (KLTI).

KIM Kyung Uk
South Korea
2013 Resident

KIM Kyung Uk (fiction writer; South Korea) is the award-winning author of six short story collections including [Is Leslie Chung Dead?] (2005), [Risky Reading] (2008) and [God Has No Grandchild] (2011), and six novels, among them [The Golden Apple] (2002), [Kingdom of Thousand Years] (2007), [Like a Fairy Tale] (2010) and [What is Baseball?] (2012). He teaches creative writing at Korea National University of Arts. He participates courtesy of the Arts Council Korea.

Kim Seoryung
South Korea
2013 Resident

KIM Seoryung (fiction writer; South Korea) has since her debut in 2003 published seven books, including the novels [The Chop Waltz] (2010) and [Humming on the Bicycle] (2012), and the award-winning story collection [Where Do I Go] (2012).  Her most recent work is the collection of prose [We Need Sundays; 2013]; the novel [Nana] is being serialized in the daily Hankyoreh. She is an editor of the [Quarterly Literature Magazine] and an administrator in the literature division of the Asia Culture Network. She participates courtesy of the Literature Translation Institute of Korea.

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