2007 Resident Participants

Hana ANDRONIKOVA

Hana ANDRONIKOVA is a widely-published Czech prose writer. She received the Magnesia Litera Award in 2002 for her first novel, Zvuk slunecnich hodin (‘The Sound of the Sundial, 2001’) and went on to author a collection of short stories, Srdce na udici (‘Heart on a Hook,’ 2002). Her fiction has appeared in numerous journals and anthologies in Europe and the U.S., including World Literature Today. Currently, she works as an independent consultant in Prague. She participates courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.

Elena BOSSI

Elena BOSSI has authored one collection of poetry, Jirones (‘Rags,’ 1990), and several volumes of literary criticism, most recently Seres Mágicos que habitan en la Argentina (‘Magical Beings of Argentina,’ 2007). Her work has been published in numerous magazines and journals. She has received fellowships from the University of Urbino (Italy) and the National Endowment for the Arts Secretariat of Culture in Argentina. She participates courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.

Chris CHRYSSOPOULOS

Chris CHRYSSOPOULOS is among the most prolific young prose writers on the Greek literary scene. He has authored four novels, most recently ‘Imaginary Museum,’ 2005; a volume of essays (‘The Language Box,’ 2006), a collection of short stories (‘Napolean Delastos’ Recipes,’ 1997), a novella (‘The Parthenon Bomber,’ 1996), and, with Diane Neumaier, an exhibition catalogue (Encounters, 2003) and an artist book (The black dress, 2002). His work is available in five languages and he has been awarded grants in Europe and the US. He participates courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.

Nirwan DEWANTO

Nirwan DEWANTO is widely published in Indonesian journals, magazines, anthologies and newspapers. A founder of the cultural journal Kalam, he has a collection of essays Sanjakala Kebudayaan ('Twilight of Culture') and a volume of poems, Buku Cacing ('Book of Worms'); the poetry collection Perenang Buta ('Blind Swimmer') is forthcoming. He has founded the arts space Komunitas Utan Kayu in Jakarta, and curates literary arts festivals, most recently the 4th Utan Kayu International Literary Biennale. He participates courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.

Tom DREYER

Tom DREYER has authored three novels, most recently Equatoria (2006) and one collection of short stories, Polaroid (2007). Born in Cape Town, he publishes in English and Afrikaans. Among his awards is the 2001 Eug�ne Marais Prize from the South African Academy for Arts and Science for his second novel Stinkafrikaners (2000). His poems and prose have appeared in numerous journals and anthologies in South Africa. Currently, he is at work on his fourth novel, tentatively titled Benguela. He participates courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.

Hamdy EL GAZZAR

Hamdy EL GAZZAR is widely-published prose writer and playwright in the Arab world. He has written and directed several plays and written documentary films for Egyptian TV. His debut novel, Black Magic (2005), was awarded the Sawiris Foundation Prize in Egyptian Literature in 2006. An English translation of the novel is forthcoming in 2007 from AUC Press. Currently, he directs the Research Department of Egypt’s Culture TV Channel. He participates courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.

Alex EPSTEIN

Alex EPSTEIN was born in Leningrad (USSR) and has been living in Israel since the age of 8. Widely translated, Epstein is the author of three collections of short stories, most recently Blue Has No South (2005) and three novels, most recently Dream Recipes (2002). Among his awards is the Prime Minister's Prize for Literature (2003). He writes literary reviews for several newspapers and teaches creative writing in Tel Aviv. He participates courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.

István László GEHER

István László GEHER holds degrees in Hungarian and English Literature from L. Eötvös University in Budapest. He has authored five books of poetry, most recently I Lay Me Down Thy Soul to Keep (2006). His translations of Larkin, Dickinson, Shakespeare, Hughes, and Yeats have appeared widely in journals and anthologies. His awards include a fellowship to the International Writers’ House in Rhodes, an NKA Literary Grant, and the Radnóti Award for Poetry. Géher participates courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.

Malim GHOZALI PK

Malim GHOZALI PK works in a variety of literary genres. Among his best-known works are the novels Redang (1988) and Janji Paramaribo (1990), the short story collection Usia (2006), and the poetry volumes Gemaruang (1987) and Fantasi Malam (2007). He is currently at work on a new novel, Daun [‘The Leaf’]. His awards include an ESSO-GAPENA Literary Prize, a Public Bank Literary Award, the Berita Publications Literary Prize, and two Malaysian Literary Prizes. He participates courtesy of the Literary Bureau of Malaysia.

Ayurzana GUN-AAJAV

Ayurzana GUN-AAJAV is a graduate of the Maxim Gorky Literary Institute in Moscow. He has published six books of poetry, two collections of short stories, several non-fiction books, and three novels. In 2002, he was awarded the National Literary Award Altan Od [Golden Feather] for Durlalgui yrtontsiin blues [‘The Blues of a World Without Love’] and again in 2003 for the novel Ilbe zereglee [‘The Magic Mirage’]. He participates courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.

Simone INGUANEZ

Simone INGUANEZ has published two collections of poetry: 'Water, Fire, Earth, and I' (2005) and Ftit Mara Ftit Tifla (‘Part Woman Part Child,’ 2005). Some of her works are available in English, French and Finnish, with German translations forthcoming. Inguanez holds a degree in Law from the University of Malta. She has worked as an editor and translator in Malta. She participates courtesy of the U.S. Embassy in Floriana.

Khaled KHALIFA

Khaled KHALIFA has written extensively for film and television and authored three novels (titled, in translation 'The Guard of Deception,' 1993; The Gypsy Notebooks, 2000; and In Praise of Hatred, 2006), published in multiple editions in the Arab world. His honors include a 2007 award from the Ismaiiliyah International Festival for Documentaries and a 2005 Award for Best Script for Bab al Maqam, from the Valencia Film Festival. Currently, he is working on his fourth novel, A Parallel Life. He participates courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.

KHET Mar

KHET Mar is one of Myanmar’s most active literary voices. She has published one novel (‘Wild Snowy Night,’ 1995), a volume of essays (‘Learning from My Son,’ 2001), and a collection of short stories with three other women writers (‘The Pink Before Dark,’ 1996). Her work has appeared in numerous journals and magazines, was adapted into radio plays, and a story (‘Not Novel’) was made into a short film in Japan. Currently, she works as a freelance journalist in Yangon.

KIM Reon

KIM Reon holds a degree in English literature from Yonsei University. She is the author of six novels, most recently ‘Gardenia and Mulberry in the Summer Days’ (2006). Among her awards is the 1997 Hankyoreh Literature Award, which she received for her fourth novel, ‘So Was I Once a Swinger of Birches.’ Her fiction has appeared in numerous journals and magazines. She participates courtesy of the Korean Literature Translation Institute.

Peter KIMANI

Peter KIMANI is a newspaper editor making a name as a satirist and novelist. Awarded the inaugural Okoth K’Obonyo Playwriting Competition in 1994, he attended the Mesa Refuge writing residency in California in 1999. His first novel, Before the Rooster Crows, was published in 2002 to wide acclaim. He is currently the managing editor of the national paper Saturday Times in Kenya, while working on his second novel. He participates courtesy of a private gift to the IWP.

Angelo R. LACUESTA

Angelo R. LACUESTA has published two collections of short stories in English, Life Before X (2000) and White Elephants (2005). A third collection, Survivors and Other Stories, is forthcoming in 2007, along with his first novel. Lacuesta’s awards include two National Book Awards from the Manila Critics Circle, the Madrigal-Gonzalez Best First Book Award, several Don Carlos Palanca Memorial Awards, and Philippine Graphic Magazine Literary Awards and the NVM Gonzalez Award. He is the literary editor of the Philippines Free Press. He participates courtesy of the U.S. Embassy in Manila.

LO Yi-Chin

LO Yi-Chin 骆以军 holds degrees from the Chinese Culture University and the National Institute of the Arts in Taiwan. He has published ten books of fiction and poetry, most recently 'We' (2004). Among his awards are a First Prize in Fiction from the China Times Literary Awards and a Taipei Literary Annual Award. His work is regularly named on the top ten lists compiled by various newspapers in Taiwan.

Kei MILLER

Kei MILLER won the Jamaica Observer Literary Prizes for both fiction and poetry in 2002. His first collection of poetry, Kingdom of Empty Bellies, came out in 2005, the year he also attended the Yaddo artist colony; another volume, There Is An Anger That Moves, will appear later this year. His 2006 short story collection, The Fear of Stones and Other Stories, was short-listed for the Commonwealth Writers First Book Prize. Miller is the editor of New Caribbean Poetry (2007). He participates courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.

Kiran NAGARKAR is a widely-read bilingual author in contemporary Indian literature, working in both English and Marathi. His novels and screenplays have been well received in India, England, Germany, and the U.S., leading to a Rockefeller Fellowship, the 2000 Sahitya Akademi Award for Best Novel (Cuckold, 1997), and a City of Munich Fellowship. Nagarkar’s latest novel in English, God’s Little Soldier (2006), has been translated into German, with French, Italian and Spanish translations forthcoming. He participates courtesy of the U.R. Ananthamurthy Foundation.

Vijay NAIR

Vijay NAIR is the author of the novel Master of Life Skills (2006) and several plays. Recent stage productions include Scars in My Memory; Shadows on the Wall; Weeds; The Window; and The Gloomy Rabbit, all of which he wrote, directed and/or staged. In 2005, Nair received the Charles Wallace Award from the British Council, and was Writer-in-Residence at the University of Kent, Canterbury. Current projects include a second novel, a new play, and a film script. His website is www.vijaynair.net; he participates courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the US Department of State.

Kavery NAMBISAN

Kavery NAMBISAN has worked as a surgeon in rural areas throughout India. She currently runs a medical centre for workers in Maharashtra, and a Learning Centre for their children. She has authored five novels, most recently ‘The Hills of Angheri,’ 2005, and several children’s books. Among her honors is a UNICEF-CBT Award for her children’s novel, ‘Once Upon a Forest.’ She also writes on healthcare issues for Indian press. She participates courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.

Beaudelaine PIERRE

Beaudelaine PIERRE is the author of three novels, most recently Ratures aux Quotidiens [‘Daily Articles,’ 2004], which she co-wrote with Gaspard Dorélien. Her debut novel Testaman [‘The Will’] won First Prize in the 2002 Best Creole-Language Novel Contest sponsored by the newspaper Bon Nouvel in Port-Au-Prince. She participates courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the US Department of State.

Lawrence PUN

Lawrence PUN (潘國靈) has authored three novels, most recently ‘The Lost Land’ (2005), and a number of non-fiction works. Among his awards are the Hong Kong Youth Literary Award, a Chinese Literature Creative Award, and the 7th Hong Kong Chinese Literary Biennial Award. His fiction appears regularly in journals and anthologies in Hong Kong and mainland China. He currently teaches creative writing at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He participates courtesy of the Asian Cultural Council.

RA Heeduk

RA Heeduk received her PhD in Korean Language and Literature from Yonsei University in 2006. She has authored five books of poetry, most recently ‘A Disappeared Palm’ (2004); one collection of essays (‘A Water Bucket Filled By Half,’ 1999); and a volume of literary criticism (‘Where Does the Purple Come From,’ 2003). Among her awards is an I-San Prize for Literature (2004). She currently teaches literature at Chosun University in Kwangju. She participates courtesy of Arts Council Korea.

Al-Mustaqeem M. RADHI

Al-Mustaqeem M. RADHI has translated four volumes of non-fiction from English and Arabic into Malay, and in 2006 edited the treatise ‘Islam and Pluralism.’ An accomplished editor, he has managed political and economic journals at the Open Dialogue Center and the Institute for Policy Research. Currently, he is Executive Director of the Middle Eastern Graduate Centre in Kuala Lumpur. He participates courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.

Aziz Nazmi SHAKIR-TASH

Aziz Nazmi SHAKIR-TASH works in Arabic, Turkish, and English both as a scholar and as a writer. He has authored three books of poetry, most recently ‘A Sky at 33’ (2007), and one collection of short stories (‘Rain Apocrypha,’ 2004). An accomplished translator and editor with more than a dozen translations of poetry and prose to his credit, he publishes both in Bulgaria and in Turkey. He participates courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.

Ognjen SPAHIC

Ognjen SPAHIC studied Civil Engineering and Philosophy at the University of Montenegro. He has authored one novel, Hansenova djeca (‘Hansen’s Children,’ 2004), and two collections of short stories, Sve to (‘All That,’ 2001) and Zimska potraga (‘Winter Search’ 2007) . His novel, which won a 2005 Mesha Selimovic Award, is available in French and Polish translations. He works as journalist for the independent daily press, Vijesti, in Podgorica. Spahic participates courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.

Saša STANISIC

Saša STANISIC (novelist, Germany) was born in Višegrad, Bosnia. In 1992, his family escaped the war and came to Germany. He has authored a novel, several audioplays, short stories, poems, essays and translations. How the Soldier Repairs the Gramophone, his first novel, was published in 2006 to wide acclaim. Translations into 21 languages are forthcoming. Stanisic is now working on a play and his second novel. More information about this author can be found here and here. He participates courtesy of the Max Kade Foundation.

Verena TAY

Verena TAY has spent the last two decades working in Singapore’s English-language theatre. Since 1997, she has concentrated on solo performances. Some of her recent projects include Cotton & Jade (2000), Medea: One on One (2002), 3 Women (2005) and Between Woman and Man: The Erasure of Verena Tay (2007). Another of her plays, The Car, won Action Theatre’s Theatre Idols in 2005; The Car was fully staged at The Esplanade Theatre Studio in 2006). Tay teaches voice, speech, and presentation skills in Singapore. She participates courtesy of the National Arts Council (Singapore), the Singapore International Foundation, The Substation arts center, and other sources.

Penelope TODD

Penelope TODD writes fiction for youth and adults. She lives in New Zealand's southernmost city of Dunedin where she works as an editor. Zillah, the final installment of her young adult Watermark trilogy, was published this year. A memoir, Digging for Spain, is forthcoming in 2008, and she is at work on a new novel for adults, tentatively titled On this Island. She participates courtesy of Creative New Zealand.

2007 Visitors

Peter COLE

Peter COLE is a poet and translator of Hebrew and Arabic. His original volumes include Rift (Station Hill) and Hymns & Qualms (Sheep Meadow Press). A third volume, What Is Doubled: Poems 1981-1989, was recently published by Shearsman Books in the UK. His 1996 translation, Selected Poems of Shmuel HaNagid, received the Modern Language Association’s Scaglione Prize for Translation. Other translations from contemporary Hebrew and Arabic literatures are Love & Selected Poems of Aharon Shabtai (Sheep Meadow), J’Accuse, by Aharon Shabtai (New Directions), and So What: New & Selected Poems, 1971-2005 by Taha Muhammad Ali (Copper Canyon Press). Winner of the 2004 PEN-America Translation Award, Cole lives in Jerusalem, where he co-edits Ibis Editions. He is a 2007 MacArthur Fellow.

Maria GALINA

Maria GALINA grew up in Odessa. She has a degree in marine biology. Her first publication was in Yunost (Youth) in 1991. From 2000-2001, she was a regular columnist for Literatunaya Gazeta. She is currently a chief editor of Drugaya Storona (The Other Side), a non-commercial literature project, and a columnist for the magazine Znamya (Banner). Galina is the recipient of numerous literary awards, including the Novyi Mir Prize in 2005 and the prestigious Moskovski Schyot (The Moscow Tally) in 2006. Galina's novel, The End of Summer, is available in English translation from Glas publishers (2006, trans. Andrew Bromfield), and her novel Givi i Shenderovich (Givi and Shenderovich,) is forthcoming in English. She participates courtesy of the Open World Cultural Leaders Program.

Reginald GIBBONS

Reginald GIBBONS is a faculty member in Northwestern's Department of English and Classics, where for sixteen years he edited TriQuarterly magazine. He is the author of 30 books, most recently an edited collection of the autobiographical writings of William Goyen entitled Goyen: Autobiographical Essays, Notebooks, Evocations, Interviews. His eighth collection of poems will be published in 2008, and he has also written several poetry chapbooks. He has held Guggenheim and NEA fellowships in poetry, and has won the Anisfield Wolf Book Award, the Carl Sandburg Prize, and the Folger Shakespeare Library's 2004 O. B. Hardison Jr. Poetry Prize. His work has been anthologized in Best American Poetry and The Pushcart Prize.

NA Teng Choon James

NA Teng Choon James was born and educated in the Phillipines. At 17 he published his debut poetry collection, Melancholic Score. More books followed, namely Springtime in Autumn, The Rainbow Snatcher, and The Blue Dust. Na's poetry explores a range of techniques, from lyric to aesthetic and contemporary forms. In the eighties he published two more collections, Wild Plant and In the Light of Poetry and Photography. His participation is independently funded.

Leonid KOSTYUKOV

Leonid KOSTYUKOV is a graduate of the Department of Mechanics and Mathematics at Moscow State University, as well as the Literary Institute. His articles, essays, poems, and prose have appeared in Friendship of Nations, Independent Newspaper, Postscriptum, Pushkin, Russian Telegraph, Solo, Week, Weekly Magazine and others. His essay, "On American Culture," was included in the collection Amerika: Russian Writers View of the United States. His work in Russian includes a collection of short fiction He Returned to Our City and the novel The Great Country. Currently, he is the editor of the multimedia journal, Devushka s Veslom (Girl with an Oar) and a member of the selection committee of the Debut prize, one of Russia's premiere contests for young writers. He participates courtesy of the Open World Cultural Leaders Program.

Ilya KUTIK

Ilya KUTIK is an acclaimed poet, essayist, and scholar working across Russian and Scandinavian literatures. He has published many volumes of poetry and translations, most recently The Death of Tragedy, and several books of essays and criticism. Other recent titles include The Ode and The Odic: Essays on Mandelstam, Pasternak, Tsvetaeva, and Mayakovsky; Hieroglyphs of Another World: On Poetry, Swedenborg, and Other Matters; and Writing as Exorcism: The Personal Codes of Pushkin, Lermontov, and Gogol. At Northwestern University, he teaches courses in Russian and Scandinavian literature, film and visual arts in the Department of Slavic languages and literatures.

Salman MASALHA

Salman MASALHA holds a Ph.D. from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where he has taught Arabic language and literature. He is the author of six volumes of poetry in Arabic, most recently Lughat Umm (‘Mother Tongue,’ 2006), and one collection in Hebrew, Ehad Mikan (‘In Place,’ 2004). His articles, columns, poems, and translations have appeared widely in Arabic, Hebrew, and European languages. He currently serves on the editorial board of Masharef, a quarterly Arabic journal. He participates courtesy of the United States-Israel Education Foundation (USIEF).

Lindsay Simpson

Lindsay SIMPSON (novelist, journalist, non-fiction writer; Australia) spent twelve years as an investigative journalist with The Sydney Morning Herald and in 1999 was the founding member of the Journalism and Media Studies program at the University of Tasmania. Author of six books of non-fiction, she currently lectures on journalism and writing at James Cook University. In 2006 she published her first novel, The Curer of Souls. Her participation is partly funded by James Cook University.

Sergey Soloukh

Sergey SOLOUKH (prose writer; Russia) was trained as a mining engineer. He is the author of numerous works including the titles Papa Zappa (1997) and The Lonely Hearts Club of Hunter Prishibeyev, as well as three collections of short stories. For three successive years, he was awarded the prestigious Kazakov Prize (2003, 2004, and 2005). He lives in Siberia with his wife and two children, where he works as a business manager for a mining equipment production company. He participates courtesy of the Open World Cultural Leaders Program.

Ekaterina Taratuta

Ekaterina TARATUTA (novelist, fiction writer, philosopher, editor; Russia) graduated from Novosibirsk State University, first from the Department of Linguistics, and then from the Department of Philosophy. She lectures on social philosophy at St. Petersburg State University, from where she received her PhD. She also works as a freelance columnist, and is regularly published in newspapers and both academic and non-academic journals. Taratuta’s Russian-language publications include works of fiction (‘One Hundred and One Minutes,’ 2007, ‘The General Hygiene of Dr. Andreas,’ forthcoming, ‘Fishes and Frogs,’ forthcoming), and an academic text titled ‘A Philosophy of Virtual Reality,’( 2007). She participates courtesy of the Open World Cultural Leaders Program.

Aleksandr Mikhaylovich ULANOV

Aleksandr Mikhaylovich ULANOV (poet, writer, critic, translator; b. 1963, USSR; lives in Russia) earned a Ph.D. in engineering from Samara State Aerospace University, where he is currently an associate professor of aircraft engine design. Although he does not consider writing to be his principal occupation, he is extremely active in the Russian literary scene. Ulanov has over 250 publications to his credit, including works of poetry, short fiction, book reviews, articles on modern Russian literature, and translation works. He is participating courtesy of the US Congress Open World Program, and will be in Iowa City 9/16 to 9/30.

2008 40th Anniversary Guests

Abdalla Mohamed ABDALLA was born in 1953 in Sudan, where he worked as a teacher, freelance musician, activist and journalist (where he wrote on culture and politics for various newspapers and magazines). He has co-authored a book on traditional Sudanese musical instruments and composed music for two films. In 1991 he went into exile, and lived in Russia and Egypt before coming to the United States as a refugee in 1996.

Roberto Ampuero

Roberto AMPUERO is the author of nine novels, one volume of short stories, and one collection of essays. Born in Chile, he lived in Cuba, East Germany, West Germany, and Sweden before coming to the United States in 2000. He was an IWP fellow in 1996, and earned his master’s and doctorate degrees at the University of Iowa, where he now teaches Latin American literature and creative writing and leads a Spanish-language fiction workshop. He also writes columns for La Tercera and the New York Times Syndicate. His work has been published throughout Latin America as well as in Croatia, China, France, Germany, Italy, Portugal, Spain, and the US. His last novel, Pasiones griegas, was voted “Best Novel Published In Spanish In 2006” by the National People’s Publishing House of China and the Association of Chinese Hispanists. Currently he is working on a novel to be released in 2008.

Oscar Argueta

Oscar ARGUETA was born in San Luís Jilotepeque, Jalapa, Guatemala, in 1954. At the age of 7 he was taught the art of tailoring by his uncles, and from his maternal grandmother he learned Mayan mythology and a long list of refrains and sayings. He graduated as a teacher from INCAV, and in the early 1980s studied fashion merchandising in Salt Lake City, Utah. In 2000 he published the book Nostalgia. At present he is the director and publisher of El Heraldo Hispano, a biweekly Spanish newspaper with a circulation of 6,000 distributed in 26 towns in Iowa and Illinois. Father of nine and grandfather of six, he has resided in Mount Pleasant, Iowa since September 1999. In 2006 he was named by former Governor Thomas Vilsack to serve as a commissioner on the Iowa Commission of Latino Affairs.

Richard T. Arndt

Richard T. Arndt just left the presidency of Americans for UNESCO; previously he headed the American Fulbright Association of US alumni. He served for 24 years in the Near East, South Asia and Europe with the State Department and the U.S. Information Agency, principally as Cultural Attache in Beirut, Colombo (Sir Lanka), Tehran, Rome, and Paris. He presently chairs the US Committee for the Preservation of Ancient Tyre. His major book The First Resort of Kings: American Cultural Diplomacy in the 20th Century appeared in 2005 and in paperback in 2006; in 1993 he was principal editor of The Fulbright Difference: 1947-92. He holds a Ph.D. in French literature (18th century) from Columbia University, where he taught until 1961. Since leaving the Foreign Service, he has taught at the University of Virginia, Johns Hopkins, and George Washington University. He has seven grandchildren.

Sandra Barkan

Sandra Barkan recently retired from her position as associate dean of the Graduate College at the University of Iowa. While at UI, she also was a professor in the Department of Cinema and Comparative Literature, specializing in African literatures. She has held offices in the African Literature Association and the African Studies Association, and also served as Interim Director of the International Writing Program and Executive Director of the Honors Program.

Marvin Bell

Marvin Bell is the author of 18 volumes of poetry and essays. His honors include the American Academy of Arts and Letters Award in Literature, Guggenheim and National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, and Senior Fulbright appointments to Yugoslavia and Australia. He is a long-time member of the faculty of the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, where he is the Flannery O'Connor Professor of Letters. He has twice been named Poet Laureate of the state of Iowa.

Cheng Chou-yu

Cheng Chou-yu (鄭愁予) came to the IWP in 1968 and earned an MFA from the Iowa Writers' Workshop. He taught Asian Studies at the University of Iowa, then at Yale for over twenty years. Recently retired from Yale, he is now teaching poetry at Hong Kong University. He has published several volumes of poetry, and is widely considered the modern Li Po. Like the Tang poet, he believes in the enjoyment of life: poetry, nature, and drinking. Musicality is prominent in his Chinese-language poetry. He is a frequent traveler, as demonstrated by his line: "I am a passer-by, not a returned man." (Photo from Iowa City, early 1970s)

Stavros Deligiorgis

Stavros Deligiorgis was born in 1933 in Sulina, Romania, of Greek parents. He attended the Greek community schools of Sulina and Bucharest before emigrating to Greece after WWII. From 1947-1957 he lived with his parents in a 2,000-inmate refugee camp while also finishing his secondary education and graduating from the National University of Athens. He studied English and American literature at Yale on a Fulbright scholarship, and Comparative Literature, Classics, Old and Middle English at the University of California at Berkeley. Between 1965 and 1996 he taught in the English and Cinema and Comparative Literatures departments at the University of Iowa. He has received numerous research awards, and his publications include books and articles in scholarly journals, as well as performance and intermedia art projects.

Lyombe "Leo" Eko

Lyombe “Leo” Eko is an associate professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Iowa. He has served as a journalist and producer at the African Broadcasting Union (URTNA) in Nairobi, Kenya, and at Cameroon Radio and Television Corporation. He has produced several video documentaries on African topics, three of which have won honorable mention at festivals in Germany and Canada. His research has been published in many journals, including The International Journal of Communication Law and Policy, Journal for Journalism in Southern Africa (Ecquid Novi), and the Encyclopedia of International Media and Communications.

Dedi Felman is an editor of Words Without Borders and a a senior editor at Simon & Schuster. She reads several languages and helped found The Front Table, a book- review web publication.

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